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The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents (Discworld #28)

The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents (Discworld, #28) - Terry Pratchett

The piped piper comes to a town in Uberwald, but finds that he’s late to the show that features cats, rats, and stupid-looking kids talking to one another.  The twenty-eighth and first young adult entry of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents finds the residents—new and old, human and nonhuman—town of Bad Blintz figuring out the fine line between real life and a story.  The aim to bring the same Pratchett humor that adults love to a younger audience is on target.

 

A mixed troupe of “rat piper” con-artists arrive just outside the town of Bad Blintz lead by a streetwise tomcat, who a clan of talking rats and a stupid-looking kid named Keith on the streets of Ankh-Morpork.  But everyone is getting fed up with just going around and doing the same old thing, the rats want to find a home to build their society and the kid would like to play more music.  Maurice is just interest in money and hiding the guilty for how he gained the ability to speak, but he found more than he’s bargaining for in Bad Blintz because something weird is going on even his talkative rat associate find disturbing.  Soon the troupe find out that they have stumbled into a long running conspiratorial plan hatched from a surprising source.

 

As always, Pratchett connects his humor around a well-known fairy tale or story then completely turns it on its head when the same circumstances happen on Discworld even as the characters fight their own preconceptions when comparing “stories” to “real life”.  The fact that he ably brought his unique style to a young adult market without losing any of the punch from the jokes makes this a very good book.  Although some of the sections of the book were somewhat familiar to a long-time Pratchett reader does take a little away from the book, it doesn’t necessarily ruin the book for first time readers.

 

Terry Pratchett’s first Discworld foray into the young adult genre is classic Pratchett through targeted at a younger audience.  I found it as funny as the rest of his series, but some of the plot points were simpler than his usual work for obvious reasons.  However this minor fact doesn’t ruin a very good book.