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Sweet Sue's Adventures (Living Forest #11)

Sweet Sue's Adventures - Sam Campbell

The length of a mother skunk’s time with her young is less than three months, but even in those three months you can learn a lot.  Sweet Sue’s Adventures is the penultimate book of Sam Campbell’s Living Forest series, yet unlike all of the other books in the series this one completely different.

 

Sam Campbell takes the reader on a journey of six hikes to a nearby farm and follow the adventures of a female skunk just before she gives birth through to the raising of her big family to when they leave, all of that under three months.  However this time, Campbell writes in such a way that the reader becomes an active participant of the narrative like a student going out with an old-timer to learn instead of relating a variety of events around the Sanctuary of Wegimind or another location that his wife and he travelled to.  Yet the information learned about the skunk like its eating habits, the raising of it’s young, and the warning signs before it sprays you with its pungent odor are extremely interesting.

 

As stated before, Sweet Sue’s Adventures is a completely different book than its predecessors.  The first was the change of narrative style as noted above, the second was that instead of being easy to read for all ages this book was aimed at younger readers specifically, and third was the inclusion of 48 black-and-white photographs of Sue and her litter instead of the occasional illustrations.  Being the shortest book of the entire series at around 120 pages with photographs and wide spacing made this a very quick read, though informative.

 

Sweet Sue’s Adventures is a quick lite read aimed at young readers about an animal that is stereotyped as always smelling.  While it is completely different from previous Living Forest books, Sam Campbell packs it was information that is suited to his target audience.  Though adults readers and probably first time reader might find it juvenile, for experienced readers of Campbell it’s a nice quick read on a rainy day.