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Anselm of Canterbury: The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics)
Anselm of Canterbury
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City of God

City of God - Henry Bettenson, Augustine of Hippo

As a backlash against Christianity grew after the sack of Roman in 410 AD, Augustine of Hippo took up his pen to respond to pagans and philosophers as well as inform Christians about their priorities between heaven and earth.  The City of God is one of the cornerstones of medieval Christianity and thought that even influences the world today.

 

Augustine divides his work into 22 books divided into two parts.  The first part was to refute the accusation by pagans that the sack of Rome in 410 AD was punishment for abandoning the gods of Rome for Christianity.  Throughout the first ten books of his work, Augustine critiques the Roman religion and philosophy from the multitude of deities and the contradictory beliefs related to them as well as the conflicting philosophies that supported and opposed them.  The second part, consisting of the last twelve books of the work, discussed the titular City of God and how it relates with the city of man—the present world.

 

Augustine’s critique of pagan religion and philosophy in the first part of the book is honestly the highlight of the book.  Not only did he defend Christianity but also exposed the contradictions within pagan religious beliefs a well as numerous schools of philosophies which defended or opposed those beliefs.  If there was one downside within the first part, it would have been the troubling theological ideas that Augustine espoused that seemed more based on Plato than the Bible.  However, it was in the second part of book that Augustine’s faulty theology truly became apparent so much so that I had to begin skimming through the text to prevent myself from contradicting Augustine in my head instead of reading.  While not all of Augustine’s theology is wrong, God’s omniscience and human free will is an example, some of the defining examples I want to cover is the following: the immortality of the soul and eternal burning in hell connected to it, the claims that passages from the Old Testament are analogies for Christ and the church, that all of Psalms are prophecies written by David, the angels were created on the third day, and many more.  It became too frustrating to stay focused and I admittedly might have skimmed over some of Augustine’s better theological arguments, but it was that or tossing the book.

 

City of God is both the refutation of pagan Roman practices and the theological understanding of Augustine for Christian believers.  It’s importance for medieval Christianity and thought cannot be underscored enough, however that does not mean that every reader should not look at it critically.